This is a guest post by Paul Stringfellow from Gardner Systems and was originally posted at “Building a modern data platform – The Storage” where you can also find Paul’s “Tech Interviews” podcast.

wp_20160518_07_53_57_rich_li.jpgIt probably isn’t a surprise to anyone who has read my blogs previously to find out that when it comes to the storage part of our platform, NetApp are still first choice, but why?

While it is important to get the storage right, getting it right is much more than just having somewhere to store data, it’s important, even at the base level, that you can do more with it. As we move through the different elements of our platform we will look at other areas where we can apply insight and analytics, however, it should not be forgotten that there is significant value in having data services available at all levels of a data platform.

What are data services?

These services provide added capabilities beyond just a storage repository, they may provide security, storage efficiency, data protection or the ability to extract value from data. NetApp provide these services as standard with their ONTAP operating system bringing considerable value regardless of whether data capacity needs are large or small, the ability to provide extra capabilities beyond just storing data is crucial to our modern data platform.

However, many storage providers offer data services on their platforms, not often as comprehensive as those provided in ONTAP, but they are there, so if that is the case, why else do I choose to use NetApp as a foundation of a data platform?

Data Fabric

“Data Fabric” is the simple answer (I won’t go into detail here, I’ve written about the Data-Fabric_shutterstock.jpgfabric before for example Data Fabric – What is it good for?), when we think about data platforms we cannot just think about them in isolation, we need considerably more flexibility than that, we may have data in our data centre on primary storage, but we may also want that data in another location, maybe with a public cloud provider, we may want that data stored on a different platform, or in a different format all together, object storage for example. However, to manage our data effectively and securely, we can’t afford for it to be stored in different locations that need a plethora of separate management tools, policies and procedures to ensure we keep control.

The “Data Fabric” is why NetApp continue to be the base storage element of my data platform designs, the key to the fabric is the ONTAP operating system and its flexibility which goes beyond an OS installed on a traditional controller. ONTAP can be consumed as a software service within a virtual machine or from AWS or Azure, providing the same data services, managed by the same tools, deployed in all kinds of different ways, allowing me to move my data between these repositories while maintaining all of the same management and controls.

Beyond that, the ability to move data between NetApp’s other portfolio platforms, such as Solidfire and StorageGrid (Their Object storage solution), as well as to third party storage such as Amazon S3 and Azure Blob, ensures I can build a complex fabric that allows me to place data where I need it, when I need it. The ability to do this while maintaining security, control and management with the same tools regardless of location is hugely powerful and beneficial.

API’s and Integration

When we look to build a data platform it would be ridiculous to assume it will only ever contain the components of a single provider and as we build through the layers of our platform, integration between those layers is crucial and does play a part in the selection of the components I use.

API’s are increasingly important in the modern datacentre as we look for different ways to automate and integrate our components, again this is an area where NetApp are strong, providing great third party integrations with partners such as Microsoft, Veeam, VMware and Varonis (some of which we’ll explore in other parts of the series) as well as options to drive many of the elements of their different storage platforms via API’s so we can automate the delivery of our infrastructure.

Can it grow with me?

One of the key reasons that we need a more strategic view of data platforms is the continued growth of our data and the demands we put on it, therefore scalability and performance are hugely important when we chose the storage components of our platform.

NetApp deliver this across all their portfolio. ONTAP allows me to scale a storage cluster up to 24 nodes delivering huge capacity, performance and compute capability. The Solidfire platform, inspired by the needs of service providers, allows simple and quick scale and a quality of service engine which lets me guarantee performance levels of applications and data, this is before we talk about the huge scale of the StorageGrid object platform or the fast and cheap capabilities of E-Series.

Crucially NetApp’s Data Fabric strategy means I can scale across these platforms providing the ability to grow my data platform as I need and not be restricted by a single technology.

Does it have to be NetApp?

Do you have to use NetApp to build a data platform? Of course not, but do look at whatever you choose as the storage element of your platform that it can tick the majority of the boxes we’ve discussed , data services, a strategic vision and ability to move data between repositories and locations and provide great integration , while ensuring your platform can meet the performance and scale demands you have on it.

If you can do that, then you’ll have a great start for your modern data platform.

This is a guest post by Paul Stringfellow and was originally posted at

https://techstringy.wordpress.com/2018/02/08/building-a-modern-data-platform-the-storage/

reprinted here with permission.

Written by Paul Stringfellow

Paul is Technical Director at a long established UK based IT consultancy Gardner Systems. A technology enthusiast who likes to understand how technology impacts organisations of all types. He shares his enthusiasm via his BLOG at techstringy.com as well as the Tech Interviews Podcast which can be found at podcast.techstringy.com...
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